Digital farmers usher in new era

PwC

Type: Article
Knowledge level: Introductory

Farm Table says:

Good to see PwC has established a business arm specifically for agriculture, and an interesting article about changes in technology and trends for our industry.

With agriculture now the largest contributor to national GDP growth and the fastest growing economic sector, PwC has launched a new specialist food and agribusiness advisory service, and Queensland farmer Greg Quinn is one of the lead partners. Clients are a mix of major global food companies, major retailers, global investors, domestic food producers and manufacturers and the corporate farm gate – mainly beef, dairy and horticulture.

This new service reports the next wave of technology will transform agribusiness and farmers and will be just a click away from the consumer.

“But the biggest change is being driven by technology and changing consumer preferences. I Iook forward five years and the picture is transformed,” Quinn says.

The biggest shift is digital bringing the consumer ever closer to the farmer, gradually cutting out the middleman.

With farmers getting closer to the consumer via technology, this means they can get first-hand insights into how consumers are changing and think ahead about the type of products they will grow. “If 20 per cent of meals per day are consumed in cars as they are in the US today, what does that mean for what we produce?” Quinn asks. “We still grow a lot of beef and wheat but the market is moving away from bigger coarser grain and if you are closer to the consumer, you pick this up and might switch to nuts or dried fruit or healthy snacking-style products.”

While some farmers bury their head in the sand, most are adept at adjusting to change. “Farmers by nature, are the biggest risk takers and they are street smart. They attend a lot of conferences and they now have access to much better content and advice,” he says.

Full article available via link.

2017 - Australia - PwC
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