« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Bio-inspired Slowness for Robotic Systems

April 17 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am

You’ve heard of the slow food movement but have you heard of slow robots? Join us for a lively lecture from Distinguished Professor Ronald Arkin as he discusses why slowness in robotic systems is a quality that is typically undervalued.

Professor Arkin believes slowness has utility in animal behaviour in certain species and that it may also provide useful qualities for robotic implementations in appropriate circumstances, including persistent autonomy for precision agriculture. In particular his teams study mammalian behaviour as evidenced in the tree sloth and slow Loris as the basis for the behaviours of a robot capable of residing in an arboreal ecological niche.

They are investigating ethologically guided design of a robotic controller, inspired by these animals behaviour, that manage their energy expenditure efficiently under resource constrained environments through a combination of thermoregulatory and behavioural strategies. This has potential implications for the design of energy efficient mobile robots (or Slowbots) for long-term applications such as precision agriculture and surveillance.

Ronald C. Arkin is Regents’ Professor and Director of the Mobile Robot Laboratory in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. He served as STINT visiting Professor at KTH in Stockholm, Sabbatical Chair at the Sony IDL in Tokyo, member of the Robotics and AI Group at LAAS/CNRS in Toulouse, and is currently on sabbatical leave in Brisbane Australia at the Queensland University of technology and CSIRO.

Dr. Arkin’s research interests include behaviour-based control and action-oriented perception for mobile robots and UAVs, deliberative/reactive architectures, robot survivability, multiagent robotics, biorobotics, human-robot interaction, machine deception, robot ethics, and learning in autonomous systems. His books include Behaviour-Based Robotics, Robot Colonies, and Governing Lethal Behaviour in Autonomous Robots.