Crops That Perform Well In Waterlogged Conditions – Will That Become A Reality?

GRDC - Meixue Zhou, Ke Liu, Matthew Tom Harrison, S. M. Nuruzzaman Manik, Chenchen Zhao and Peter Johnson (Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, University of Tasmania)

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: "A new gene for waterlogging tolerance has been discovered in a barley wild type. The addition of the tolerance gene into a commercial variety improved grain yield by more than 20% compared to the original variety under waterlogging conditions in both the tank and field, which correlated to a 1-2 t/ha yield increase. The addition of the gene influencing waterlogging tolerance into current commercial barley varieties may have huge benefits for growers in the high rainfall zones of Australia and may also have application in medium rainfall zones where waterlogging is less frequent. Collaboration with seed and breeding companies and assistance with a rapid backcrossing program will enable growers to benefit from new waterlogging tolerant varieties within 2-3 years." Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take home messages from the paper include:

  • Waterlogging can cause losses in barley production worth over $20 million per annum in the high rainfall zone (HRZ) of Australia.
  • Natural variation in waterlogging tolerance was shown by barley varieties and a tolerance gene has been discovered in a wild-type barley.
  • The effectiveness of the gene and its impact on yield and quality are currently being tested.
  • An agreement has been reached with a breeding company to introgress the gene into their commercial varieties so it can be tested in well adapted backgrounds.

2020 - Australia - GRDC - Meixue Zhou, Ke Liu, Matthew Tom Harrison, S. M. Nuruzzaman Manik, Chenchen Zhao and Peter Johnson (Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, University of Tasmania)
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