Dry seeding – more wins than losses

Grains Industry Association of WA - Darshan Sharma, Doug Abrecht and Andrew Fletcher

Type: PDF
Knowledge level: Intermediate

This article focuses on the benefits of dry seeding. Throughout the article there is a list of experiments presented, as shown in the table below. The article explains the aim, method and results in detail.

Key messages

• Dry seeding provides logistical and production benefits in cropping programs which largely outweigh any increase in production risk. For instance, simulation analysis of 100% dry seeding across a 6000ha, heavy soil-type farm in Merredin found that the area affected by frost around flowering only increased slightly (from 12.5% with no dry seeding to 15% with 100% dry seeding), whereas the area affected by heat stress decreased markedly (24% to 11%).

• The only situation where dry sown crops are at high risk is when canola (not wheat) is sown in early April into a soil with little stored moisture and an early rainfall event of less than 20mm falls. Notwithstanding, seedling survival following such a rainfall event, is still likely to be adequate to achieve yield potential if the rainfall event occurs after 20 April.

• A weed and pest free paddock is a pre-requisite when using dry seeding to lift farm profits through increased farm level yields and increased capacity to sow a larger area. (GIWA)

2015 - Australia - Grains Industry Association of WA - Darshan Sharma, Doug Abrecht and Andrew Fletcher
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