Effects of dried distiller’s grains and lasalocid on feedlot lamb growth, carcass traits, nutrient digestibility, ruminal fluid volatile fatty acid concentrations, and ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentration

A. R. Crane, R. R. Redden, K. C. Swanson, B. M. Howard, T. J. Frick, K. R. Maddock-Carlin, and C. S. Schauer - Proceedings, Western Section, American Society of Animal Science

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

This paper offers a lot of detailed data on the effects of feedlot diets that contain dried distillers grain and lasalocid. Great if you are interested in the details of rumen digestion and the effects on lamb performance.

What is the problem?

As a by-product of ethanol production, dried distillers grain (DDG) is an affordable addition to the diet of feedlot lambs. Previous studies have shown it to be beneficial to the performance of these feedlot lambs. The authors of this study wished to evaluate the potential increased performance of the DDG diet when lasalocid (LAS) was included. LAS helps to improve feed efficiency by inhibiting hydrogen and ammonia producing bacteria.

What did the research involve?

In May 2016, two hundred forty crossbred (Suffolk × Rambouillet) lambs were grouped by BW and sex and randomly assigned to 1 of 16 outdoor pens (10 lambs/pen). Each one of the pens was randomly assigned one of the following dietary mixes.

  • 0% DDG without LAS
  • 0% DDG with LAS
  • 15% DDG without LAS
  • 15% DDG with LAS
  • 30% DDG without LAS
  • 30% DDG with LAS

Lambs were weighed throughout, and feed grab sampled for content assessment. The feedlot study was for 111 days.

What were the key findings?

Including LAS in the diet increased final body weight, average daily gain and the grain to feed ratio. Increase the ration of DDG decreased dry matter intake, as well as sulfur excretion. Overall, the inclusion of LAS in DDG feedlot diets helped to increase overall growth performance, but also had an effect on rumen pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids.

Final comment

The authors conclude the addition of LAS and dried distiller’s grains in the feedlot rations result in improved lamb feedlot performance.

2016 - United States - A. R. Crane, R. R. Redden, K. C. Swanson, B. M. Howard, T. J. Frick, K. R. Maddock-Carlin, and C. S. Schauer - Proceedings, Western Section, American Society of Animal Science
Read ArticleSave For Later

Related Resources