How to compost on farm

DPI NSW - Abigail Jenkins, Soil Advisory Officer, Lukas Van Zwieten, Research Scientist NSW Agriculture

Type: PDF
Knowledge level: Introductory

Farm Table says:

The rules of composting are the same whether you are making a small pile for your own garden or a large windrow for commercial production. The key elements needed when making good thermophilic compost are described in the following fact sheet

This fact sheet was produced by NSW Agriculture in 2003 and looks into what composting is about.

Composting is the breakdown of any organic material (ingredients) into a crumbly, dark, soil-like product in
which none of the original material can be easily identified.  This document provides the basic information you need
to make thermophilic compost from your farm organic wastes

The types of composting include:

  • Vermicomposting—use of composting worms
  • Passive composting—slow degradation of plant wastes—such as adding mulch to soil
  • Thermophilic composting—rapid breakdown of organic material where the compost pile gets hot and sterilises seed and pathogens.

The key sections include:

  • the benefits of composting
  • What you need to make a good compost – aeration, a suitable area, moisture, organic ingredients, machinery and cover
  • How to create a good compost – constructing a pile, turning the compost and monitoring the temperature
  • Troubleshooting guide
  • Knowing when it is ready

 

2003 - Australia - DPI NSW - Abigail Jenkins, Soil Advisory Officer, Lukas Van Zwieten, Research Scientist NSW Agriculture
Read ArticleSave For Later

Related Resources