Improving Harvest Management Decisions In Canola

GRDC - Rick Graham (NSW DPI, Tamworth), Leigh Jenkins (NSW DPI, Trangie), Kathi Hertel (NSW DPI, Narrabri), Rohan Brill (NSW DPI, Narrabri), Rod Bombach (NSW DPI, Tamworth), Don McCaffery (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Neroli Brennan (NSW DPI, Orange)

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: “Findings from this research highlight the potential for significant yield and quality penalties due to early windrow timings (i.e. before 40% seed colour change on the primary stem), with yield losses of up to 55% and decreases in oil concentration of up to 7.7% units observed. This study indicates that seed colour change should ideally be measured on a whole plant basis and not based solely on the assessment of seed from the primary stem when determining windrow timing operations. Furthermore, results demonstrated the potential benefit of delayed windrow timings related to seed colour change, with yields optimised at the upper end of current industry guidelines of ≥60% seed colour change”.   Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

Improving harvest management decisions in canola – implications of seed colour change and windrow timing on seed yield and oil concentration

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take home messages from the paper include:

  • Seed colour change occurs later on the branches of canola plants compared to the primary stem.
  • Research examining the partitioning of yield between the primary stem and branches found that branches can contribute up to 80% of total yield.
  • Relying solely on seed colour change from the primary stem to determine windrow timing could result in overall seed development being underestimated, potentially impacting seed size, yield potential and oil concentration.
  • Results highlight the potential for significant yield and quality penalties associated with early windrow timings, before 40% seed colour change on the primary stem.
  • There is potential for yield and oil concentration benefits to be obtained with delayed windrow timings at the upper end of current industry guidelines ≥ 60% seed colour change.
  • Given the significance of the proportion of yield contributed by the branches as opposed to the primary stem there appears to be a need to reconsider how windrow timing is determined.

2018 - Australia - GRDC - Rick Graham (NSW DPI, Tamworth), Leigh Jenkins (NSW DPI, Trangie), Kathi Hertel (NSW DPI, Narrabri), Rohan Brill (NSW DPI, Narrabri), Rod Bombach (NSW DPI, Tamworth), Don McCaffery (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Neroli Brennan (NSW DPI, Orange)
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