Local Immunisation and Escherichia Coli Mastitis

Vincent Herry, Christophe Gitton, Guillaume Tabouret, Maryline Répérant, Laurine Forge, Christian Tasca, Florence B. Gilbert, Edouard Guitton, Céline Barc, Christophe Staub, David G. E. Smith, Pierre Germon, Gilles Foucras & Pascal Rainard - Scientific Reports

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

A paper that is heavy on the immune response of the cow to vaccination and infection - interesting, but not production focused.

Impacts the response of dairy cows

What is the problem?

Mastitis is an infection of the mammary gland, and is the major disease of dairy cows. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the main bacterial pathogens of mastitis. Vaccination against E. coli mastitis is available, and researchers from France and the UK investigated the efficacy of vaccination when delivered locally (intramammary) or intramuscular.

What did the research involve?

The study used 18 Holstein-Frisian cows, purchased at 1 year old and raised together. The vaccination scheme was as follows, and cows were  challenged with E. coli at days 44 – 56 in milk.

  1. Intramuscular injections (IM; n=6). Cows received two IM injections two months apart, at three months and one month before calving.
  2. Intramammary boost (IMM; n=6). Cows received intramuscular injection of the immunisation preparation three months before calving and an intramammary injection one month before calving.
  3. Control group (n=6) was injected with adjuvant by the intramuscular route twice at the same dates.

Samples were taken the day before challenge, and from 4 – 176 hours post challenge.

What were the key findings?

The local immunisation resulted in improved bacterial clearance, while limiting inflammation and systemic clinical signs. Local immunisation modified the cytokine profile, adding to the understanding of how the E. coli vaccine works for mastitis.

Final Comment

The researchers show that local immunisation with the E. coli vaccine for mastitis can help minimise clinical signs and that the immune response is cell-mediated immunity based.

2017 - United Kingdom - Vincent Herry, Christophe Gitton, Guillaume Tabouret, Maryline Répérant, Laurine Forge, Christian Tasca, Florence B. Gilbert, Edouard Guitton, Céline Barc, Christophe Staub, David G. E. Smith, Pierre Germon, Gilles Foucras & Pascal Rainard - Scientific Reports
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