Manage Stubbles Without Compromising The ‘Big Things’ – Weeds, Disease, Pests And Timeliness!

GRDC - Tony Swan and John Kirkegaard (CSIRO Agriculture), James Hunt (La Trobe University, formerly CSIRO Agriculture) Gupta Vadakattu (CSIRO Agriculture), Kellie Jones (FarmLink Research), Brad Rheinheimer (CSIRO Agriculture), Colin Fristch (FarmLink Research) and Melanie Bullock (CSIRO Agriculture)

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: “This paper has outlined several ways to flexibly manage stubble retained farming systems that ensure profitability and sustainability. It is extremely important for growers to NOT compromise managing weeds, disease, pests or being able to sow their crop due to excessive stubble loads. Growers need to be pro-active in managing their stubble which should have commenced before harvest and continued until sowing the following year to ensure their stubble management will suit their seeding system”.   Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take home messages from the paper include:

  • Don’t let stubble compromise the BIG THINGS – weeds, disease, pests and timeliness.
  • Be flexible and pro-actively manage stubble for your seeding system.
  • Harvest high = reduced costs and is quicker.
  • Cereal stubble should be thought of as a source of carbon (C), not nitrogen (N) (<6% crop N needs obtained from straw).
  • Post-harvest management: if necessary reduce stubble load by mulching, incorporation with nutrients, baling or grazing.
  • If stubbles are too thick to sow through, consider strategic late burn, especially before the second wheat crop or if sowing canola into large stubbles.
  • Managing N at sowing: deep band N and add 5kgN/t cereal stubble.
  • Diversify your crop sequence and add legumes to rotation.
  • Incorporate AHRI’s ‘Big 6’ for weeds (disc or tine)

2018 - Australia - GRDC - Tony Swan and John Kirkegaard (CSIRO Agriculture), James Hunt (La Trobe University, formerly CSIRO Agriculture) Gupta Vadakattu (CSIRO Agriculture), Kellie Jones (FarmLink Research), Brad Rheinheimer (CSIRO Agriculture), Colin Fristch (FarmLink Research) and Melanie Bullock (CSIRO Agriculture)
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