New Genetics To Improve Wheat Establishment And Weed Competitiveness

GRDC - Greg Rebetzke (CSIRO), C. Ingvordsen (CSIRO), W. Spielmeyer (CSIRO), B. French (DPIRD), C. Zaicou-Kunesch (DPIRD), N. Fettell (CWFS)

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: “Competitiveness can be thought of as the partial to complete suppression of competing weeds to increase crop yield, or the ability of a variety to tolerate a competitor to maintain higher yields. Selection for greater tolerance is a breeding strategy for many crop insects and diseases but is of less value in weed management as low numbers of weed survivors replenish the seed bank for the next season. In turn, breeding of competitive crops has focused on selection of genotypes that can better access light, water and nutrients to suppress the growth of weeds. Greater early vigour, as rapid leaf area development and biomass at stem elongation and altered root architecture are mechanisms that contribute to the ability to out compete weeds”.   Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take home messages from the paper include:

  • Current Australian wheat cultivars contain dwarfing genes that reduce coleoptile length by 40%. New dwarfing genes are available that reduce plant height but don’t reduce coleoptile length
  • A gene increasing coleoptile length was identified and tagged with DNA markers. Breeding lines and DNA markers for new dwarfing and coleoptile length genes have been delivered to Australian breeders for efficient selection of improved crop establishment
  • Deep-sowing studies in WA and NSW Managed Environment Facilities show benefit with new dwarfing and coleoptile length promoting genes in increasing emergence at sowing depths of up to 120mm but without changing plant height
  • Moisture-seeking points coupled with new genetics should reliably allow seed placement and emergence from sowing depths of 100mm or greater, and/or with warmer soils
  • Genetic variability exists with potential to suppress weeds through greater shoot and/or root competitiveness.

2019 - Australia - GRDC - Greg Rebetzke (CSIRO), C. Ingvordsen (CSIRO), W. Spielmeyer (CSIRO), B. French (DPIRD), C. Zaicou-Kunesch (DPIRD), N. Fettell (CWFS)
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