Pulse Adaptation – Optimising Grain Yield Of Chickpea And Lentils

GRDC - Mark Richards, Lance Maphosa and Aaron Preston (NSW DPI Wagga Wagga), Tony Napier (NSW DPI Leeton) and Iain Hume (NSW DPI Wagga Wagga).

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: "The 2018 and 2019 experiments indicate that there are differing optimum sowing windows between varieties and locations. It is important to note that this data was collected over two years that were characterised by drier than average growing conditions, increased incidence of abiotic stress events and lower yields. Matching sowing date and varietal phenology (genotype x sowing time combination) ensures that the sensitive growth stages such as flowering and podding occur at optimal times. Results from 2018 and 2019 indicate that sowing around the mid-May period gives the varieties tested the best opportunity to avoid abiotic stresses and allows efficient conversion of biomass to grain yield. Early sowing or longer maturing varieties such as PBA Greenfield risk greater exposure to potential frost damage and late season adverse conditions such as terminal drought and heat stress. Early sowing also results in low harvest index as most of the accumulated biomass is not converted to grain yield. This often leads to higher incidence of plant lodging, especially for lentil. Diversity of genotypes was observed for both crops as seen with PBA Striker (chickpea) and PBA Bolt (lentil) expressing differing phenology responses." Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take key messages from the paper include:

  • Dry conditions severely limited grain yield for both chickpea and lentil in 2019.
  • Results from 2018 and 2019 indicate that sowing around the mid-May period gave the varieties tested the best opportunity to avoid abiotic stresses and allows efficient conversion of biomass to grain yield. Earlier sowing resulted in greater biomass production, but less grain yield.
  • Diversity in phenology was observed in both species. This presents opportunities for growers to exploit variety phenology to select varieties best suited to their sowing program and to optimise production.
  • Higher yielding chickpea varieties were the desi varieties; PBA StrikerPBA SlasherPBA Boundary and CICA1521 at both sites.
  • Highest yielding lentil varieties were PBA AcePBA Bolt and PBA Hurricane XT at Wagga Wagga, and PBA Hallmark XT and PBA Bolt at Leeton. Nipper demonstrated broad adaptation at Wagga Wagga.

2020 - Australia - GRDC - Mark Richards, Lance Maphosa and Aaron Preston (NSW DPI Wagga Wagga), Tony Napier (NSW DPI Leeton) and Iain Hume (NSW DPI Wagga Wagga).
Read ArticleSave For Later

Related Resources