Self-assessment – Animal health and welfare

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Grazing Best Management Practices and The State of Queensland.

Type: PDF
Knowledge level: Introductory

Farm Table says:

This useful self-assessment guide will assist producers in improving their management of animal health and welfare. A great management tool that can be used to improve on farm procedures and practices.

This useful guide is for producers to be able to self-assess their enterprise for the purpose of animal health and welfare. It covers a lot of information so even the most experienced producers should be able to gain some tips to assist in their own enterprise.

Items covered in this article were:

  • Health management
  • Extreme weather conditions
  • Biosecurity
  • Animal welfare
  • Livestock transport

Key points were as follows:

  • Health management includes purchasing or breeding stock that are best suited to the area and preventing diseases with a vaccination program to manage the health of your herd. The self-assessment checklist for health management can be found on page 7 – 9.
  • Extreme weather conditions include fire, flood and drought so having a management plan in place in the event of one of these events occurring is best management to ensure action can be taken quickly. The self-assessment checklist for extreme weather conditions can be found on page 12.
  • Biosecurity planning for your enterprise should consider the following:
  1. Livestock health
  2. Livestock movements
  3. Quarantine procedure
  4. Vehicle access
  5. Feral animal management
  6. Fodder biosecurity
  7. Record keeping
  8. The self-assessment checklist for biosecurity can be found on page 15 – 17.
  • Animal welfare is an important aspect of a livestock enterprise; it covers animal husbandry, care, treatment, feed, water, handling, humane destruction and staff training. The self-assessment checklist for animal welfare can be found on page 20 – 23.
  • Livestock transport covers animal welfare from the time the truck picks the cattle up until they have safely reached their destination. The truck driver has a duty of care to ensure that any risk of injury is minimised to the livestock during the transportation. The self-assessment checklist for livestock transport can be found on page 25 – 28.
2014 - Australia - Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Grazing Best Management Practices and The State of Queensland.
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