Stubble And Nutrient Management To Build Soil Carbon – Challenges And Opportunities

GRDC - Bhupinder Pal Singh and Yunying Fang (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI)), Annette L Cowie (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI) and University of New England) and Ehsan Tavakkoli (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI)).

Type: Research Paper
Knowledge level: Advanced

Farm Table says:

The authors of this paper note in the conclusion: "This study shows the importance of considering the impacts of stubble management and nutrient availability on microbial activity, as this will determine the extent of stubble decomposition, formation of stable SOM, and mobilisation of soil nutrients for plant growth." Please access the full paper via the link below if this research interests you.

The take home messages from this GRDC funded research are below. Please access the full paper via the link below for methodology, references, acknowledgements and discussion.

Take home messages from the paper include:

  • Preserving or enhancing soil organic matter stocks is critical to sustainable agriculture, due to its key role in soil health, plant productivity and building resilience. Stubble return with strategic nutrient inputs (‘integrated stubble-nutrient management’) has been proposed as a measure to build soil organic matter in cropped soils.
  • The supply of extra nutrients along with wheat stubble enhances stocks of stable soil carbon if wheat stubble input is high (12t/ha), which is unlikely under rainfed conditions in normal seasons. At more common rates (less than or equal to 4t/ha), there may be no benefit on improving stable soil organic matter through the integrated stubble-nutrient management.
  • Where stubble input is high, the addition of extra nutrients considerably enhances microbial biomass, potentially leading to build-up of stable organic matter, especially in clay soils.

2020 - Australia - GRDC - Bhupinder Pal Singh and Yunying Fang (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI)), Annette L Cowie (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI) and University of New England) and Ehsan Tavakkoli (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSWDPI)).
Read ArticleSave For Later

Related Resources